Michael Burmester

Designing Technology for Positive Experiences

Thursday, October 8th

09:45 - 10:30

Key Learnings

  • Designing for positive user experience is different from designing for good usability
  • Positive user experience can be much more than just having fun and enjoyment with technology
  • Positive user experience needs a clear understanding which factors are driving positive experience by technology

Details

User experience has become an important buzzword in the design of human-computer interaction. Looking into lecture books and into study results, the understanding of what user experience really is and especially how to design for it is quite heterogeneous. Very often it is just a new label for usability engineering and user-centred design, may be with some extensions like aesthetics.
The corpus of user experience research is focussed on user experience for consumer products. Little attention is given to the significance of designing technology for positive user experience in work contexts.

This talk will show and explain the differences between designing for good usability and designing for positive user experience. Furthermore, it will be demonstrated that design positive experiences through software in work contexts is possible and has benefits for work experience. Designing for positive user experience needs a new way of thinking and designing technology. Approaches like experience design and positive design indicate new perspectives for innovation and for achieving much broader and deeper goals like designing for well-beeing and flourishing of people in interaction with technology.


Thursday, October 8th

09:45 - 10:30

Required Experience
90% Level of Experience
Involvement
40% Involvement

Michael Burmester

Prodekan / Vice Dean Research - Stuttgart Media University

Prof. Dr. Michael Burmester studied psychology at the University of Regensburg and Wuppertal in Germany. He started his career as a human-computer interaction researcher at the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering (IAO) in Stuttgart. In 1997, he joined Siemens Corporate Technology – User Interface Design as usability consultant and researcher for usability engineering. From 2000 to 2002, he was the head of the Munich office and the head of the Usability Engineering department of User Interface Design GmbH, a software and usability consultancy company. Since September 2002 he is professor for ergonomics and usability and head of the user experience research laboratory at the Stuttgart Media University (Hochschule der Medien, HdM). Furthermore, he is representative of the Information Experience and Design Research Group (IXL) and Vice Dean Research of the faculty information and communication. As project coordinator of the research project Design4Xperience, funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, his research interests are to develop design strategies for positive user experience in work contexts.

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