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Bruce Horn

User Experience in a World of Intelligent Agents

Wednesday, October 11th

09:20 - 10:15

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Thanks to Moore’s Law, steadily increasing compute, memory, and storage capacities (and lower costs), and ubiquitous connectivity and data collection (cellphones, internet activity, connected vehicles and so on) have made it possible to maintain a detailed profile on every single person on the planet.  Intelligent digital agents will use this profile, with medical, financial, political and behavioral data, to interact with you as you go about your daily life.  The potential for these agents to assist people in complex decision making is vast, but there is also the potential for misuse and misdirection.  How can we make sure that these agents act and influence in the best interests of each individual, for communities, and for all of humanity?


Wednesday, October 11th

09:20 - 10:15


Bruce Horn

Chief Technical Officer - Intel Fellow

Bruce Horn is an Intel Fellow and Chief Technical Officer for the Saffron Technology Group, part of the New Technology Group (NTG) at Intel Corporation. He is responsible for driving new applications and uses for Saffron’s memory-based reasoning system, a fundamentally new approach in the development of intelligent personal devices and systems. 

Previous to joining Intel, Dr. Horn was Principal Research Software Development Engineer at Microsoft Corp. where he worked on the creation and deployment of Natural Language systems for Bing, Microsoft’s search engine. Before joining Microsoft, he was at Powerset Inc. where he was responsible for the computational infrastructure of the Powerset Natural Language Search System.

Horn is most widely known for his work at Apple, where he created and developed the Macintosh Finder – the first widely-used desktop graphical user interface. He began his career as a member of the Learning Research Group at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, where he contributed to several implementations of the Smalltalk virtual machine.

Horn earned a B.S. In Mathematical Sciences from Stanford University in 1981, and an M.S. And Ph.D. In Computer Science from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1994.

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